Strokes on a Word Canvas

I wish I could write something funny. 
Something that would make you smile or even laugh out loud. 
I don’t do that much — wish I could.

I mean there are funny and wonderful things left in this world. Like when our great-grand comes to visit. 
The sound of his little feet either coming or going on the floor of the hall. I smile just thinking about it. 
Or his absolute delight to give a dog biscuit to Sara who eagerly receives every touch of loving he gives her. 
The moments we spend watching birds and squirrels from the window seat – it’s one of his favorite places here. 

Friends who call just because they care.
Silly jokes made funny simply because he said it. 
Sunrises. 
Sunsets.
Bright moon nights.
A chicken sandwich and french fries eaten side by side sitting cross-legged in the back of the SUV, watching people watch us as they drive through a local parking lot.
Now that’s funny!

If you’ve never done it. I hope you will give it a try.
A burger and fries will work just as well as chicken. 🙂

Sowing seeds in the garden box, waiting for sprouts. 
Music and snuggles on the couch.

Family. People. Creation’s beauty.
These are the things we have left. 
And most days they help us smile in spite of what is. 

Nothing Much

Saturday morning. 
Sunshine and green with small and few struggling brown swatches of mower fodder I see from my opened-blind window. 
And the clock ticks, ticks, ticks as the pendulum sways. 
Pages lay open waiting to be read. 
Cold coffee awaiting the drain. 
Quiet sounds; distance traffic and the ringing in my ears. 🙂

A lovely Saturday indeed. 

A picture is worth a thousand words some say . . .  is it? 

 

 

Christmas Star 2020

Some are calling it the Christmas Star. Ready for viewing on December 21. This December 21.

The Internet is brimming with information. I’ve perused a few webpages and thought I’d share a bit with you.

Every 20 years, our solar system’s largest planets align during their orbits around the sun. Jupiter and Saturn’s last conjunction was in 2000. But this year is particularly special because the two will appear to separated by just one-fifth the diameter of a full moon – or 0.1 degrees – an occurrence the world hasn’t seen since the Middle Ages.

The last time Jupiter and Saturn came this close was 1623, but that conjunction was too near the sun to be seen by Earthlings. So 1226 is actually the most recent time such a close conjunction of Jupiter and Saturn was visible to humans.  
This information comes from Worlds align this winter solstice: Look for Jupiter, Saturn in December skies  Wyatte Grantham-Philips  USA TODAY

I was told from a source that I cannot cite for you that this 1623 occurrence which is believed to have not been seen was about the time the Mayflower arrived here in America. Interesting. I think. 

Another interesting article can be found here: A ‘Christmas Star’ we haven’t seen in 800 years will be twinkling over N.J. skies later this month

Then there is the Astronomy website with a piece entitled: Jupiter and Saturn will form rare “Christmas Star” on winter solstice

Here’s an Excerpt from Astronomy:

This December, Jupiter and Saturn will put on a show for skygazers that hasn’t been seen in roughly 800 years. Astronomers are calling it the Great Conjunction of 2020. On December 21 — coincidentally the winter solstice — the two largest planets in our solar system will appear to almost merge in Earth’s night sky.

During the event, Jupiter and Saturn will sit just 0.1 degrees apart, or a mere one-fifth the width of the Moon. The sight will likely leave many casual observers wondering “What are those large, bright objects so close together in the sky?”

In fact, Jupiter and Saturn will be so close that you will be able to fit them both in the same telescopic field of view. That’s an incredibly rare occurrence. The last time Jupiter and Saturn were this close together away from the Sun was in 1226 A.D., at a time when Genghis Khan was conquering large swaths of Asia, and Europe was still generations away from the Renaissance.

Humanity won’t have to wait quite as long to see the solar system’s two largest planets repeat this month’s performance, though. Another Great Conjunction will occur in 2080. Of course, many of us alive today won’t be around then, so it would be wise to soak in this show while you can.

There is much more information at the Astronomy site, including, but not limited to, charts, helpful information to locate and experience this event; as well as a YouTube window which will be LIVE STREAMING on December 21. 

So if you are interested, you might want to visit the site, bookmark it, and return on December 21. 

Watching the Skies ~ ~ ~

Did you know?

Did you know Peter read Paul’s Epistles? 
I think he did.
2 Peter 3:16. 
Well, let’s start at verse 14 for the fun of it. 

14 Therefore, beloved, looking forward to these things, be diligent to be found by Him in peace, without spot and blameless; 15 and consider that the longsuffering of our Lord is salvation—as also our beloved brother Paul, according to the wisdom given to him, has written to you, 16 as also in all his epistles, speaking in them of these things, in which are some things hard to understand, which untaught and unstable people twist to their own destruction, as they do also the rest of the Scriptures.  source 

And look at that Peter calls his readers, beloved. I remember in some recent studies I was comforted and encouraged at the depth (what I saw in the Text) of love Paul had for his people. And I think as I study Peter more I will find he had great love too. 

Our beloved brother Paul.
Wow.

According to the wisdom given to him, he wrote to you. 

And then verse 16. as also in all his epistles, speaking in them of things, . . .

Peter read Paul’s Epistles. 

I like that!

One more thing. Did you know the word PEACE appears 397 times in the NKJV?